Skip to main content

Leabhar Chlainne Suibhne : an account of the MacSweeney families in Ireland, with pedigrees

Item Preview

texts
Leabhar Chlainne Suibhne : an account of the MacSweeney families in Ireland, with pedigrees


Published 1920
SHOW MORE


26


Publisher Dublin : Dollard
Pages 222
Possible copyright status NOT_IN_COPYRIGHT
Language Irish
Call number AFC-0728
Digitizing sponsor MSN
Book contributor Robarts - University of Toronto
Collection robarts; toronto
Notes There seems to have been a foldout between pages XXii and XXiii but it was mostly removed at some point.
Scanfactors 30

Full catalog record MARCXML

[Open Library icon]This book has an editable web page on Open Library.

comment
Reviews

Reviewer: Jools McSweeney - favoritefavoritefavoritefavorite - February 4, 2009
Subject: The Book of the MacSweeneys
The Book of the MacSweeneys (Lebor Clainne MacSuibhne) is one of only six bardic family historys/geneologies lodged in the Royal Irish Academy, and as such, is a work of great importance. The book itself was originally commissioned by the wife of one of the MacSweeney chiefs of Fanad (present Co.Donegal)and is therefore, historically suspect. The section dealing with the origins of the MacSweeneys is almost totally ficticious and needs to be carefully dissected and analysed in order to gain a real understanding of the clan's true origins. The claim of an ancient Irish (O'Neill) pedigree is, of course, complete nonsense. The reasons for these claims to an Irish connection are fairly obvious, as an O'Neill connection would certainly have smoothed their way into medieval Tyr Connaill at a time when there was likely to have been growing resentment at the influx of 'foreign lads', who were being cessed and billeted on their lands in Ulster.
The importance of this book lies in its recording of the family's history in Ireland, which clearly shows the MacSweeneys to have been the most important (and successfull) military aristocracy in British and Irish history. Only the Vangarian guard comes close to emulating their exploits. This is the history of my family, betrayed by English, Scots and Irish alike. Norsemen and nobles in origin, kings of Man and kings of the Gal-Gaedhil, the eponymous Suibne died in 1034, and not as the Irish annals repeatedly tell us, in the 1200's. Our true history is even more interesting than that of the book, but it reveals the ethos of a warrior caste who never took a backwards step.
SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata)
eye
Title
Date Archived
Creator
Allen County Public Library
by Walsh, Paul, 1885-1941, editor and translator; MacFithil, Tadhg, fl. 1532-1544
texts
eye 2,067
favorite 0
comment 0
University of Toronto - Robarts Library
texts
eye 1,229
favorite 1
comment 0
University of Toronto - Robarts Library
by Ó Cléirigh, Micheál, 1575-1643; Macalister, Robert Alexander Stewart, 1870-1950; Mac Neill, Eoin, 1867-1945
texts
eye 5,105
favorite 4
comment 0
University of Toronto - Robarts Library
by Camden Society (Great Britain)
texts
eye 1,125
favorite 1
comment 0
American Libraries
by Ayloffe, Joseph, Sir, bart., 1709-1781, [from old catalog] ed; London. Towers. [from old catalog]; Great Britain. Treaties, etc. [from old catalog]; Scotland. Treaties, etc. [from old catalog]; Scotland. Parliament. [from old catalog]; Morant, Philip, 1700-1770. [from old catalog]; Pre-1801 Imprint Collection (Library of Congress) DLC [from old catalog]
texts
eye 1,653
favorite 1
comment 0
Source: http://books.google.com/books?id=BzgEAAAAIAAJ&oe=UTF-8
University of Toronto - Robarts Library
by Giraldus, Cambrensis, 1146?-1223?; Wright, Thomas, 1810-1877
texts
eye 1,168
favorite 2
comment 0